Legal Writing: Connecting IRAC, syllogisms and analogies for LLM students

This past week for the frist time I did a full unit of syllogism and analogy activities with my legal writing students to prepare them for the concepts and language of IRAC-style writing. And it not only went very well–it … Continue reading

Comprehensible input for legal English students: Resources, approaches and ideas

International students in LLM and legal English programs at US law schools come to study law, not ESL. At the same time, law study requires deep engagement with texts and concepts that are complex and challenging even for native English speakers. … Continue reading

Experiments in teaching legal writing: The Yogurt Precedent Phase

When I first introduced the jogger-banana peel critical thinking question to my students, one of my strongest students commented during the class discussion that this wasn’t really legal writing. I responded that this was in fact legal writing, explaining that the “Issue … Continue reading

Legal writing: Noticing cohesion

Have you ever read something written by a non-native English speaking LLM student, and the grammar seems fine, it makes sense, and yet something seems off? Something you can’t put your finger on? That something might be “cohesion.” Cohesion is … Continue reading

Teaching legal thinking to LLM students: Oral vs. written

As I continue to work through the “multiple model answer approach” in my experiment with teaching legal writing to LLM students this semester (aka the banana peel/jogger question), I’ve also begun exposing the students to multiple recorded oral model answers … Continue reading

Experiments in Teaching Legal Writing: Getting students to write more

One of the challenges I’ve noticed with my students’ writing is getting them to write in greater volume. I’m not sure if it’s a cultural issue, or simply the way these particular students learned about writing. The issue has been particularly noticeable … Continue reading