May 1 Webinar: “Teaching Global Skills to International and U.S. Law Students”

Teaching Global Skills to International and U.S. Law Students

I’ll be one of the participants in a Legal Writing Institute live webinar next Monday from 12-1pm together with Diane Kraft of University of Kentucky College of Law and also St. John’s Law colleague Patricia Montana.

The narrated PowerPoints (which have more detail than what will be discussed in the live webinar) are already available at http://www.law.msu.edu/glws​. (Note: At this link, you can also find great prior presentations by other legal writing specialists.)

See below for more details and info on how to register:

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The Legal Writing Institute’s Global Legal Writing Skills Committee is pleased to invite you to attend a free live webinar on Monday, May 1, 2017, from 12-1 pm EST on“Teaching Global Skills to International and U.S. Law Students.”   The webinar will feature the following excellent presentations, followed by Q & A:

1. Teaching A Variety of Lawyering Skills Using A Single Transnational Civil Litigation Problem
Patricia Montana, Professor of Legal Writing and Director of Street Law Program, St. John’s University School of Law

I will present on my advanced writing course, Drafting: Transnational Civil Litigation, which I designed to develop upper-level students’ lawyering skills in the context of transnational civil litigation.  My presentation will discuss how designing a course around a single litigation involving a central international trade law convention and a well-developed set of facts can easily simulate the realities of law practice in the global market and thus benefit students tremendously.  My presentation will walk through the course development, illustrate some of the design ideas, and explain the advantages of using a single litigation to tie together all of the assignments.

2. Current Research in Contrastive Rhetoric: What Does it Mean for the Legal Writing Classroom?
Diane B. Kraft, Assistant Professor of Legal Research & Writing, University of Kentucky College of Law

Contrastive Rhetoric has been an important area of scholarship for the disciplines of Second Language Writing and English for Specific Purposes since 1966. This presentation will discuss what the most recent research tells us about the uses and limitations of contrastive rhetoric, and suggests ways to use it effectively when teaching international students in the legal writing classroom.

3. The Power of Noticing in Teaching Legal Writing to LLM Students
Stephen B. Horowitz, Director of Legal English Programs and Adjunct Professor of Law, St. John’s University School of Law

One of the challenges of learning legal writing for non-native speakers of English (NNES) is that they often feel they are writing into a vacuum. That is, they don’t have a clear sense of what their writing should look and feel like, both in terms of discourse as well as language. This is because what might be intuitive for native English speakers (NES) is not intuitive for NNES.  A simple yet powerful tool for building a sense of intuition and an understanding of what’s expected is the act of noticing. Noticing can be used very effectively in combination with model answers written by NES to help draw LLM students’ attention to certain features of legal writing in order to figure out how to better organize their writing, how to make better arguments, how to improve their grammar, what transition and connection phrases to use, when to use commas, and any other writing related challenges the students may face.

The presenters have created narrated PowerPoint slides for viewing in advance of the live webinar.  They can be found at the top of the presentations list at www.law.msu.edu/glws. This website also contains the archived Global Legal Writing Skills presentations from previous webinars.

To participate in the live webinar, please follow these instructions:

  1. Click on the URL provided for the Meeting Room or type the URL into your web browser.
  2. Click Guest Login.
  3. Type an identifiable name (e.g., First and Last name).
  4. Click Enter Room.
  5. Mute your microphone and only type questions in Chat window

Katrina June Lee will moderate the live webinar. Please contact her at katrinalee@osu.edu with questions or issues regarding the webinar.

To register for this free event, please send an email to dmlavita@suffolk.edu with “GLWS Webinar” in the subject line.

On behalf of the GLWS Committee,

Rosa Kim, Suffolk University Law School
rkim@suffolk.edu

The legal “Issue” of present tense vs. past tense

case-briefFacts: Earlier today, I was teaching LLM students about reading and briefing cases. The previous week they had examined a number of case briefs and noticed various features and characteristics. For example, after reviewing the Facts section of several case briefs, they were able to confidently conclude that nearly all verbs were in the past tense. This will help them be cognizant of tense when they write the Facts sections of their own briefs, and it will also give them a grammar-based strategy to help them more successfully identify what the facts are and are not when they read a court opinion and attempt to write a case brief.

The previous week the students also came to notice characteristics of the Issue section of the briefs. They noticed that sometimes the Issue was written in present tense and sometimes in past tense.

Today I gave them two different case briefs of the well-known Contract law case Lefkowitz v. Great Minneapolis Surplus Store, Inc. and, among other tasks, asked them to analyze and compare the Issue section of the briefs. They quickly noticed that one was past and the other was in the present.

  • Past: Did Defendant’s advertisement constitute an offer?
  • Present: Under what circumstances does an advertisement for the sale of goods constitute an offer?

Issue:

  1. How do you decide if the Issue section of your brief should be in present tense or past tense?
  2. What are the implications in terms of meaning and in terms of grammar and syntax?

Rule: Past tense is used to indicate events that already happened and are completed. Present tense is used to indicate something that is generally or always true. Continue reading

Legal writing: Noticing cohesion

MilkywayHave you ever read something written by a non-native English speaking LLM student, and the grammar seems fine, it makes sense, and yet something seems off? Something you can’t put your finger on?

That something might be “cohesion.”

Cohesion is the glue that holds our sentences together. It’s second nature to us as native English speakers and teachers of legal writing, and therefore can seem difficult to teach to LLM students. And that means it’s a good candidate for a noticing activity! Continue reading

Experiments in Teaching Legal Writing: Getting students to write more

morecowbellOne of the challenges I’ve noticed with my students’ writing is getting them to write in greater volume. I’m not sure if it’s a cultural issue, or simply the way these particular students learned about writing.

The issue has been particularly noticeable in the “Summary of the Day” activity. The students, in their summaries of the prior day’s class, inevitably include far less information and detail than I, as a reader in a higher education environment, would expect. And the same applies so far in their answers to the critical thinking question about the jogger who throws away the banana peel on the beach and whether that’s considered littering.

I think this happens in part because my students are from cultures that (as I understand it) tend to be less explicit. Or if it’s not a cultural issue in that sense, they’re definitely not familiar with the level of explicitness expected in American law school.

Regardless, the conclusion I’ve reached is  Continue reading

Noticing parentheses and quotation marks

hqdefaultI was a bit perplexed this past week when a student submitted an assignment as a Word file, and the name of the file included parentheses in an unexpected way. Like this:

StudentLastName-(Article Name)

My first impulse was to ignore it. My second impulse was to tell the student to remove the parentheses. But fortunately I curtailed those two instincts and followed my third instinct, which was Continue reading

The Issue of Questions

 

hercules and hydra“Professor, for question number one, I actually see two questions here!”  My student leans over my desk and frowns over his writing prompt, seemingly worried he is hallucinating.

Later, during an in-class critical thinking exercise, there is a kerfuffle about framing the issue presented: “Professor, the question on the paper asks whether the cyclist broke the park’s rule, but she [another student] says that the issue is whether her [hybrid] bicycle was a motor vehicle.  Which one of us is right?”

The object of this week’s lessons was supposed to be about using the facts: weeding out irrelevant information, and using relevant information in support of a legal conclusion. But the conversation has evolved into the issue of questions. They are grappling with the idea that one question can yield one or more sub-questions, and they wonder whether to choose one or harmonize both.  In return they get more questions from me: “How did you see that second question? Do you need to answer it to get an answer to the original question? How does your answer to that second question help you to answer the original question? OK, so now that you have an answer to the first question, and an answer to the second question, can you write a two-sentence conclusion that answers both? How about a one-sentence conclusion?”  Some chuckle, as though this is a game we’re playing. Others wrinkle their brows, looking very unsatisfied. I think this is a struggle worth having. Continue reading

Introducing Writing Critique

One challenge of introducing international LL.M. students to legal writing is coaxing them to evaluate and comment on examples of English writing. This is a necessarycritique practice in my writing course; students look at model answers for format and organization, notice cohesive devices and subject headings, and read examples of strong and weak analysis to compare to their own work. Students also conduct peer reviews, and revise and resubmit drafts of their work, incorporating comments from the professor and their
teaching assistants. So, students should start learning to critique, and to respond to critique, early in the course.

Critique is often daunting to international students, I think for two reasons. First, they do not have enough confidence in their English writing and reading skills to believe they can improve upon any example. Second, they  might feel uncomfortable finding fault with a classmate’s work, particularly if that classmate is a lawyer, judge, or other professional in their home country.

So a few weeks ago, I decided I’d have my new class start with me.   Continue reading